Dissipative Quantum Gibbs Sampling

APA

Zhang, D. (2023). Dissipative Quantum Gibbs Sampling. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. https://pirsa.org/23050158

MLA

Zhang, Daniel. Dissipative Quantum Gibbs Sampling. Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, May. 31, 2023, https://pirsa.org/23050158

BibTex

          @misc{ scivideos_PIRSA:23050158,
            doi = {10.48660/23050158},
            url = {https://pirsa.org/23050158},
            author = {Zhang, Daniel},
            keywords = {Quantum Information},
            language = {en},
            title = {Dissipative Quantum Gibbs Sampling},
            publisher = {Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics},
            year = {2023},
            month = {may},
            note = {PIRSA:23050158 see, \url{https://scivideos.org/pirsa/23050158}}
          }
          

Daniel Zhang Phasecraft (United Kingdom)

Source RepositoryPIRSA

Abstract

Systems in thermal equilibrium at non-zero temperature are described by their Gibbs state. For classical many-body systems, the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm gives a Markov process with a local update rule that samples from the Gibbs distribution. For quantum systems, sampling from the Gibbs state is significantly more challenging. Many algorithms have been proposed, but these are more complex than the simple local update rule of classical Metropolis sampling, requiring non-trivial quantum algorithms such as phase estimation as a subroutine.

Here, we show that a dissipative quantum algorithm with a simple, local update rule is able to sample from the quantum Gibbs state. In contrast to the classical case, the quantum Gibbs state is not generated by converging to the fixed point of a Markov process, but by the states generated at the stopping time of a conditionally stopped process. This gives a new answer to the long-sought-after quantum analogue of Metropolis sampling. Compared to previous quantum Gibbs sampling algorithms, the local update rule of the process has a simple implementation, which may make it more amenable to near-term implementation on suitable quantum hardware. We also show how this can be used to estimate partition functions using the stopping statistics of an ensemble of runs of the dissipative Gibbs sampler. This dissipative Gibbs sampler works for arbitrary quantum Hamiltonians, without any assumptions on or knowledge of its properties, and comes with certifiable precision and run-time bounds.
This talk is based on 2304.04526, completed in collaboration with Jan-Lukas Bosse and Toby Cubitt.

Zoom Link: https://pitp.zoom.us/j/96780945341?pwd=NG9SUjE4SkVia3VqazNXUFNUamhRdz09